The Proper Distinction Between Law & Gospel by C.F.W. Walther

Law&Gospel

Thesis I.
The doctrinal contents of the entire Holy Scriptures, both of the Old and the New Testament, are made up of two doctrines differing fundamentally from each other, viz., the Law and the Gospel.

Thesis II.
Only he is an orthodox teacher who not only presents all articles of faith in accordance with Scripture, but also rightly distinguishes from each other the Law and the Gospel.

Thesis III.
Rightly distinguishing the Law and the Gospel is the most difficult and the highest art of Christians in general and of theologians in particular. It is taught only by the Holy Spirit in the school of experience.

Thesis IV.
The true knowledge of the distinction between the Law and the Gospel is not only a glorious light, affording the correct understanding of the entire Holy Scriptures, but without this knowledge Scripture is and remains a sealed book.

Thesis V.
The first manner of confounding Law and Gospel is the one most easily recognized — and the grossest. It is adopted, for instance, by Papists, Socinians, and Rationalists, and consists in this, that Christ is represented as a new Moses, or Lawgiver, and the Gospel turned into a doctrine of meritorious works, while at the same time those who teach that the Gospel is the message of the free grace of God in Christ are condemned and anathematized, as is done by the papists.

Thesis VI.
In the second place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the Law is not preached in its full sternness and the Gospel not in its full sweetness, when, on the contrary, Gospel elements are mingled with the Law and Law elements with the Gospel.

Thesis VII.
In the third place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the Gospel is preached first and then the Law; sanctification first and then justification; faith first and then repentance; good works first and then grace.

Thesis VIII.
In the fourth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the Law is preached to those who are already in terror on account of their sins, or the Gospel to those who live securely in their sins.

Thesis IX.
In the fifth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when sinners who have been struck down and terrified by the Law are directed, not to the Word and the Sacraments, but to their own prayers and wrestlings with God in order that they may win their way into a state of grace; in other words, when thy are told to keep on praying and struggling until they feel that God has received them into grace.

Thesis X.
In the sixth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the preacher describes faith in a manner as if the mere inert acceptance of truths, even while a person is living in mortal sins, renders that person righteous in the sight of God and saves him; or as if faith makes a person righteous and saves him for the reason that it produces in him love and reformation of his mode of living.

Thesis XI.
In the seventh place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when there is a disposition to offer the comfort of the Gospel only to those who have been made contrite by the Law, not from fear of the wrath and punishment of God, but from love of God.

Thesis XII.
In the eighth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the preacher represents contrition alongside of faith as a cause of the forgiveness of sin.

Thesis XIII.
In the ninth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when one makes an appeal to believe in a manner as if a person could make himself believe or at least help towards that end, instead of preaching faith into a person’s heart by laying the Gospel promises before him.

Thesis XIV.
In the tenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when faith is required as a condition of justification and salvation, as if a person were righteous in the sight of God and saved, not only by faith, but also on account of his faith, for the sake of his faith, and in view of his faith.

Thesis XV.
In the eleventh place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the Gospel is turned into a preaching of repentance.

Thesis XVI.
In twelfth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the preacher tries to make people believe that they are truly converted as soon as they have become rid of certain vices and engage in certain works of piety and virtuous practices.

Thesis XVII.
In the thirteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when a description is given of faith, both as regards its strength and the consciousness and productiveness of it, that does not fit all believers at all times.

Thesis XVIII.
In the fourteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the universal corruption of mankind is described in such a manner as to create the impression that even true believers are still under the spell of ruling sins and are sinning purposely.

Thesis XIX.
In the fifteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the preacher speaks of certain sins as if there were not of a damnable, but of a venial nature.

Thesis XX.
In the sixteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when a person’s salvation is made to depend on his association with the visible orthodox Church and when salvation is denied to every person who errs in any article of faith.

Thesis XXI.
In the seventeenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when men are taught that the Sacraments produce salutary effects ex opere operato, that is, by the mere outward performance of a sacramental act.

Thesis XXII.
In the eighteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when a false distinction is made between a person’s being awakened and his being converted; moreover, when a person’s inability to believe is mistaken for his not being permitted to believe.

Thesis XXIII.
In the nineteenth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when an attempt is made by means of the demands or the threats or the promises of the Law to induce the unregenerate to put away their sins and engage in good works and thus become godly; on the other hand, when an endeavor is made, by means of the commands of the Law rather than by the admonitions of the Gospel, to urge the regenerate to do good.

Thesis XXIV.
In the twentieth place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the unforgiven sin against the Holy Ghost is described in a manner as if it could not be forgiven because of its magnitude.

Thesis XXV.
In the twenty-first place, the Word of God is not rightly divided when the person teaching it does not allow the Gospel to have a general predominance in his teaching.

You may read each of C.F.W. Walther’s lectures on these theses at this link.

A Mental Buffet // 5 Aug 2017

Mental Buffet

 

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul. This week’s mental buffet includes articles from Martin Luther (no he’s not back from the dead for a blog post), Garry Vanderveen, Jason K. Allen, and Octavius Winslow.

Luther’s Last Word on Predestination – Martin Luther

“God did not come down from heaven to make you uncertain about predestination, to teach you to despise the sacraments, absolution, and the rest of the divine ordinances. Indeed, He instituted them to make you completely certain and to remove the disease of doubt from your heart, in order that you might not only believe with the heart but also see with your physical eyes and touch with your hands. Why, then, do you reject these and complain that you do not know whether you have been predestined? You have the Gospel; you have been baptized; you have absolution; you are a Christian.”

 

The Lamb’s High Feast: Good Reasons for Weekly Communion – Garry Vanderveen

“The visible centre of the Church’s worship must not be left as a blank space for long periods of the year. Calvin, accordingly, declares himself in favour of weekly communion. “All this mass of ceremonies being abandoned, the sacrament might be celebrated in the most becoming manner, if it were dispensed to the Church very frequently, at least once a week.” “It was not instituted to be received once a year and that perfunctorily (as is now commonly the custom).” He, indeed, goes the length of saying that “we ought always to provide that no meeting of the Church is held without the Word, prayer, the dispensation of the Supper, and alms”; and he calls the custom of communication once a year “an invention of the devil”. “The practice of all well ordered Churches should be to celebrate the Supper frequently, so far as the capacity of the people will admit.”

 

Eight Tips for Veteran Preachers – Jason K. Allen

“One of the benefits of expository preaching is that it anchors the sermon in the text of Scripture, not current events. The Word of God is perennial, never needing to be updated or improved upon. At the same time, faithful preaching brings the Word of God to bear, actually pressing it upon the lives of the hearers.”

 

The Glory of the Redeemer in His People – Octavius Winslow

“He is glorified in the progressive holiness of His people. “The kingdom of God is within you,” says Christ. The increase of this kingdom is just the measure and extent of the believer’s advance in sanctification. This is that internal righteousness, the work of God the Holy Spirit, which consists in the subjugation of the mind, the will, the affections, the desires, yes, the whole soul, to the government and supremacy of Jesus, “bringing into captivity,” says the apostle, “every thought to the obedience of Christ.” Oh, you who are “striving against sin,” longing to be “conformed to the image of God’s Son,” panting to be more “pure in heart,” “hungering and thirsting for righteousness,” think that in every step which you take in the path of holiness, in every corruption subdued, in every besetting sin laid aside, in every holy desire begotten, Christ is glorified in you! But you perhaps reply, “the more I strive for the mastery, the more I seem to be conquered. The more strongly I oppose my sins, the stronger my sins seem to be.” But what does this prove? it proves that “God is working in you both to will and to do of His good pleasure,” -that the kingdom of God is invading the kingdom of Satan- that the Spirit dwelling in the heart is warring with the flesh. It is truly remarked by Owen, that “if a believer lets his sins alone, his sins will let him alone.” But let him search them as with candles, let him bring them to the light, oppose, mortify, and crucify them, they will to the last, struggle for the victory. And this inward warfare, so graphically and touchingly described in the seventh chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, undeniably marks the inhabitation of God the Holy Spirit in the soul.”

Till He Returns,

Logan

When I Don’t Feel Saved

The last two months have been a trying time for our family. Two months ago, we left a city, a church, our home and friends behind to move to Northwest Arkansas for my job. My wife has been so strong in all of this- she has never moved before. And so uprooting our lives for a place we’ve never been has been hard. We have found a new living places, a new church, and are finding new friends. But the pain is there. And she has been so patient with me not reacting or acting graciously toward her. So loving when I’m tired and I’m not pouring into her. She is, and has always been a great fountain of grace and helpfulness. My helpmeet, my ezer kenegdo.

If nothing else, these changes have made me more aware of my own sin and faults. I am constantly battling impatientce and pride, arrogance, and even doubt. The stress has caused me to sin, not in major disqualifying ways. But small ways. The ways that creep up on you. For the last few nights I have laid awake, tormented by my shortcomings, my faults, my failures. And though try as I might to preach the Gospel to myself through the Word, and to savor Christ in His sacraments each week, if I’m honest there are nights that the question taunts me:

“Does God really love me? Am I really saved?”

It’s a daunting feeling, one of hopelessness and grief. To have your sins all borne in front of you, condemning you to your face. And at the end of the day, I have no defense. I am a sinner. I am angry. I am cutoff and impatient. I am greedy and covetous. I am a guilty man. I have no where to turn but to Christ, and when I turn there I feel at times as though I have been rejected. My heart condemns me, and I don’t feel saved.

But God’s faithfulness to me isn’t based on my feelings; but rather on Christ.

“for whenever our heart condemns us, God is greater than our heart, and he knows everything.” – 1 John 3:20

I know that I am a sinner, and in that I’m comforted because Christ died for sinnners. That means Christ died for me! That he has ransomed and redeemed me. That in my doubt my only comfort is that I am not my own. But have a faithful Savior who has fully satisfied for all my sins. And that faithful Savior doesn’t abandon me, but rather is, now in my tossing and turning, interceding on my behalf.

And beause I not my own, I have no need to fear that Christ will abandon me. Not because of my work, those feeble attempts of appeasement. But because of a His work. Because Christ has stood in my guilty place I can, by faith, stand in His righteous place. That’s the greatness of the Great Exchange. Christ takes our sins, yes and amen. But we also get His ridghteousness. So that when God sees me, the doubting sinner, he rather sees Christ. I’m counted as a son.

And if Christ will not abandon me, then I can run to Him again. I can flee with my doubts and my sins and say “You’re it! You’re my only comfort, my only hope. I have no where else to turn.” And he promises that those who come will not be cast out (John 6:37). He promised to raise those who believe in Him up on the Last Day (John 6:40). And because He has been raised, I can look to Him by faith, and latch on again to find rest for my doubts.

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