Two Books About Grace

This isn’t so much a book review as much as it’s just a plain ol’ suggestion. As many things as I loved about my Pentecostal upbringing, there were also things I didn’t care for. Seeing as how Pentecostalism has its roots in Wesleyan theology, eternal security isn’t something that is commonly believed, and often it is something that is typically taught against. There are many a Pentecostal preacher who will tell you that “YOU CAN KNOW-UH THAT YOU KNOW-UH THAT YOU KNOW-UH” you’re born again, but what that means is that you have to have some kind of experience, feeling, or random subjective goosebumps. The answer to how you can know you’re born again usually doesn’t involve looking to Him, and resting in His finished work on your behalf.

When I had just turned 18 years old, if you had told me that all I had to do was look to Jesus and rest then I would’ve one of two things: (1) I would have told you that you were crazy and surely there’s got to be more to it than that or (2) I might have actually believed you and then I would have proceeded to stress myself out wondering if I was looking to Jesus hard enough like someone staring at a pot of water waiting for it to boil.

This is what Pentecostalism does to your mentality when it goes biblically unchecked for so long. Now, I’m willing to concede that maybe I just had one crappy Pentecostal pastor right after another (which the exception of one guy who was actually very helpful for me*) and just didn’t really have a true blue good ol’ AG pastor through and through to actually point me to Christ. However, the prevailing idea through all the services, revivals, and campmeetings that I had attended was you had to have a certain experience, and you had to make sure you’re always doing the “right stuff” and not doing the “wrong stuff.” So, the primary focus had to be on your emotions and your actions. If you ever said, “Well, what about looking to Jesus?” The typical response was, “Yeah, of course, look to Jesus too.” As if Jesus is just some afterthought.

So, what I would recommend to you if you’re struggling with the weight of whether or not you’re really saved and whether or not your salvation is really secure, and if you’re struggling with how you can rest in the finished work of God’s Son, then I would recommend the following two books to you:

At the time when I found of these books they were free on Kindle, but that was years ago. You have to pay full price for them now, but they’re not that expensive and they’re worth it!

I found these books at a time in my life where I wanted to believe that my salvation was secure, and all I had to do was look to Jesus, but I had so many objections in my mind that had been drilled into me. “What if I mess up again?” “I want to please God so much so why can’t I stop sinning?” “What if someone cuts me off in traffic, and I let out a bad word and then die in a car wreck?” That last question sounds dumb, but there are actually preachers who will tell you that you’re going straight to hell if that happens. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. It doesn’t matter if you’ve trusted in Christ your whole life. If you call that driver in front of you a sorry, no good ************, you’re going to spend a long time in a hot place.

As I was reading Transforming Grace, it seemed like no matter how many objections I had, Bridges had an answer for all of them, and all of his answers came straight from the Scriptures. So, as you’re reading these books, I would encourage you to read them with your Bible open and your heart ready to hear what God has to say in His Word.

These suggested titles would mean nothing if they were simply the ideas of men trying to manipulate the Scriptures, but what’s being said in both of these works is incredibly helpful for believers who are struggling with whether or not they are really saved. I do hope you’ll check these out and let me know what you think. I would love to hear from you.

“At every stage (of salvation) – justification, sanctification, glorification – we come with empty hands, seeking mercy from our heavenly father.”

Derek W.H. Thomas, How the Gospel Brings Us All the way Home

LNT RoundTable #1: Dispensationalism and Covenant Theology

Chance and I sat down with Late Night Theology contributors, Jay Sawrie and Dylan Justus to discuss Covenant Theology and Dispensationalism.

Response to WWUTT’s ‘What the Orthodox Church Believes?’

Response to WWUTT

[The following views do not necessarily reflect those of my colleagues at Late Night Theology.]

By way of introduction, I would just like to state that this is not a point by point refutation of everything in the video, it is simply a response. While there are some points that I do refute, my main objective is point out the absurdity of someone who is Reformed accusing another Christian group of believing that “no one should interpret Scripture apart from Church tradition.”

We view Scripture through a lens, it’s inevitable. When we were introduced to the Bible we were given glasses to read with. The “prescription” for those glasses might change with our continued study of Scripture and Church tradition, but we never lose glasses because if we lose our glasses we lose our ability to understand Scripture.

In Acts 8, Philip asked the eunuch, “Sir, do you understand what you’re reading?” And the eunuch gives a profound answer – “How can I unless someone guides me?” We must admit, like the eunuch, that Scripture cannot be understood apart from someone guiding us.

Ugh. These guys are crazy.

“They’re still a Roman Catholic knock off.”

Nope. More like the Roman Catholic Church is a Eastern Orthodox knock off.

“They believe that salvation is process of faith-works and partaking in the sacraments.”

Yeah, well, whatever. Luther still believed in purgatory. Obviously, the Orthodox are wrong when it comes to this issue, but whenever you have verses like John 6:54-56 and 1 Peter 3:21, can you really blame them for not wanting to ignore those texts and just say that they’re metaphorical? Here’s the thing, their tradition and interpretation of Scripture has been consistent over the last 1800 years or so. I would say that you can’t just readily dismiss a tradition that is that close to Jesus in space and time.

“The Orthodox Church believes that the sacraments literally become the flesh and blood of Christ.”

The video compares their position to the Roman Catholic position of Transubstantiation. That’s inaccurate because the Roman Catholic Church teaches that transubstantiation is the method by which the elements are transformed into the actual body and blood of Christ whereas the Orthodox Church believes that the elements become the body and blood of Christ, but they’re not sure how. It is literally a mystery to them, which is something that I can appreciate because we have this tendency to want to KNOW EVERY FREAKING JOT AND TITTLE of Christianity when it is CLEAR from Scripture that some things are just a mystery.

According to Colossians 3, we’ve died and our lives are hidden in Christ. Who we are will be revealed at the day of Christ (Colossians 3:4). Guess what? It’s a mystery.
It seems like we’ve tried to overthink Christianity to death where there’s no mystery involved in it anymore.

As I mentioned earlier, they simply don’t want to dismiss passages like John 6:54-56, and Luke 22:19, where Jesus POSSIBLY implies that the bread is His body and the wine is His blood.

“Though the Orthodox Church believes the Bible is the Word of God, they believe the Church is equal in authority, and that no one should interpret the Bible apart from Church tradition.”

Ummmmm….. Calvinists who are steeped in the Reformed community do the same damn thing with their confessions so they DO NOT have any room whatsoever to talk about this issue. As matter of fact, let me reword their statement and see if it sounds familiar – “Though Reformed Christians believe the Bible is the Word of God, they believe their confessions (1689 LBCF, 1646 WCF, Three Forms of Unity, etc.) are equal in authority, and that no one should interpret the Bible apart from these confessions.” Yep. That sounds more accurate.

“The Orthodox Church prays for the dead and believe that it is possible for salvation to occur after death.”

No. They do, in fact, pray with the dead, not to, and not for the dead. They pray with the saints, and often they ask saints in Heaven to pray for them because, to them, those saints are just as alive as you and I are, they just so happen to be in closer proximity to Jesus than we are. So, asking a saint to pray for them is no different than asking you to pray for me.

Also, they do not believe repentance is possible after death. John Karmiris, a Eastern Orthodox theologian, states, “Death terminates the moral development of man; any further evolution is rendered impossible, and retribution begins.” Clearly, they do not believe repentance and salvation are possible after death.

At the end of the video, the narrator says that it’s possible for someone to come to saving faith in an Eastern Orthodox church, but if they’re going to grow in the grace the knowledge of Christ then they need to leave. I think that’s a load of bullcrap, and at this point in my life, I’d rather send a new convert to a Eastern Orthodox congregation than any congregation that teaches that iconography of Jesus is a violation of the 2nd commandment (assuming I had to pick between the two), and there’s my rant.

A Mental Buffet // 21 Apr 2017

Mental Buffet

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

Evangelicals, Heresy, and Scripture Alone – Matthew Block

“…Christians seem to think saying Sola Scriptura is the ultimate authority somehow means it is my personal “solo” reading of Scripture that is authoritative. They reject the witness of the Church down through the ages in favor of a personal, private understanding of Scripture (which is not at all what the reformers meant by the term “Scripture alone”). Consequently, we see that many Evangelicals deny that the historic Church’s creeds and confessions have any relevance today. In fact, the 2016 report indicates that 23 percent percent of Evangelicals believe “there is little value in studying or reciting historical Christian creeds and confessions,” while a further 9 percent are unsure.

Because they privilege their own personal understanding of Scripture over the historic witness of the Church, it’s not surprising that Evangelicals deny that their congregation should have any meaningful authority over them: For example, 57 percent denied that their local church should have “the authority to withhold the Lord’s Supper from me and exclude me from the fellowship of the church.” In other words, Evangelicals believe the Bible is authoritative; and that authority is mediated by individual believers, rather than the church (even though the Bible explicitly says that authority is to be exercised by the church—e.g., Matthew 18:15-17, 1 Corinthians 5:11-13, Titus 3:10-11, etc.)”

 

How to Lose Your Freedom – Steve Brown

“You can focus on rules, regulations, propriety, and programs for righteousness; or you can focus on Christ and your relationship with him.”

 

Teaching a Calvinist to Dance – James KA Smith

“While presenting labyrinthine theological sermons in monotone from his pulpit, the Puritan preacher witnessed strange manifestations, convulsing bodies, and shouts and yelps among his congregants. But Edwards the Reformed theologian was discerning enough not to write this off, but to say, “There’s something of the Spirit in this.” In Pentecostal spirituality, the Calvinist conviction about the sovereignty of God is extended to worship in a way that makes us open to and even expectant of the sovereign Lord surprising us.”

How Fights Over Trump Have Led Evangelicals to Leave Their Churches – Washington Post 

“The two groups you’d expect were more likely to leave: Trump supporters who felt their clergy didn’t support him (represented by the red line on the left), and those who felt cool toward Trump but thought their clergy strongly supported him (represented by the blue line on the right).

This finding might help explain why evangelical clergy appear to have had little to say about Trump in their churches this fall. It’s very likely that they were concerned about alienating some of their flock.”

A Mental Buffet // 13 Apr 2017

Mental Buffet

[This was supposed to go up yesterday, but you know… stuff happens… deal with it.]

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

Here’s how you can match your Myers-Briggs personality type to a patron saint

“Church of the Resurrection, an Anglican Church in Wheaton, Ill., has created the following graphic to illustrate how the different personalities of patron saints correspond with Myers-Briggs personality types. Are you St. Francis or perhaps St. Joan (of Arc)? Check it out.”

 

Steve Brown, Etc. – Outside the Camp with Garth Cross

“Join Garth Cross on Steve Brown, Etc. for a discussion of his book, Outside the Camp: A Former Pastor Looks at the Church from a Distance. Hear the laments of sin and shame, broken community, and people in pain. Then listen as God responds with his radical grace.”

 

5 Reasons I’m a Calvinist – Stephen Altrogge

“Calvinism doesn’t have a fantastic reputation, at least in some circles. Some people feel like it focuses more on theology than on loving people. Others have had really bad experiences with Calvinists. And some people think it runs counter to the beautiful free offer of grace found in the Bible.

But what if someone who is not a jerk (at least most of the time) could talk about Calvinism in a way that didn’t make you want to smash your computer?”

 

 

Late Night Theology, Episode 1: Of Buses, Grace, and Liberals

This is the first episode of Late Night Theology, where I am joined by my good friend, Tom Ellinson to discuss his big yellow bus that he is converting to an RV. We’re also going to talk about Tullian Tchividjian and his return ministry as well as the reasons why pastors turn to liberal ideology.

Links

  1. The Freedom in Losing it All – Tullian Tchividjian
  2. Sermon: Magnificent Intervention – Tullian Tchividjian
  3. Talk: He Gave Us Stories – Andrew Peterson

Momentary Affliction and a Merciful Savior

MAMS

“But we have this treasure in clay jars, so that it may be made clear that this extraordinary power belongs to God and does not come from us. …For this slight momentary affliction is preparing us for an eternal weight of glory beyond all measure, because we look not at what can be seen but at what cannot be seen; for what can be seen is temporary, but what cannot be seen is eternal.” – 2 Corinthians 4:7, 17-18, NRSV

“So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting the message of reconciliation to us.” – 2 Corinthians 5:17-19, NRSV

Let’s get one thing clear. I suck at being a Christian. I love Jesus with all my heart. He’s my best friend. I call upon Him as Savior everyday and I pray for Him to be my Lord, and I try to submit myself to what He wants for my life, but sometimes I just blow it. If I weren’t a Calvinist, I would say that I’ve lost my salvation two or three times in the last week. The struggle that I have is real and one of the reasons I believe God allows me to have these struggles is so that I can help others who have similar problems.

You see, this whole sanctification thing is from now until we die. We’ll never be perfect until we stand in the full presence of Almighty God in Heaven. Until that moment, God continually draws us to Himself. He beckons us into a beautiful relationship with Him. And this life is full of ups and downs, unexpected turns in the road, and sometimes we lose our way. Sometimes we make bad decisions. The good news though is that Jesus didn’t lay any terms and conditions in a negotiation with the Father before He came. Jesus didn’t look at God and say, “Now Dad, I’m only going to atone for their sins if they never blow it or mess up again from the moment of their conversion.” That conversation never took place. As a matter of fact, I don’t even believe there was any negotiation because Jesus humbly submitted Himself to the Father’s will.

Spurgeon said, “God came here in human form, not bound to be obedient; but “being found in fashion as a man, he became obedient”; obedient to his own law, and fulfilled every jot and tittle of it. He was “obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” And his obedience is ours, if we believe.” So you see, Jesus was perfectly obedient because He knew we wouldn’t be. He knew we were sons of wrath and disobedience when He saved us, and then He made children of the light.

Now, I’m a secure child of God, but there are days when it feels like the darkness will not lift and I have gone too far and Jesus, in all of His love and mercy, reminds me of the atonement that He secured for me over 2,000 years ago on an old rugged cross. My sins, my mess ups, my mistakes, my depression, my habits, and hangups were nailed to the cross and Jesus had already declared His victory over them.

So if you’re reading this and you’re having one of those days, remember He’s not done with you yet. He loves you and He still says to us, “Neither do I condemn you, go, and sin no more!.”

It’s All About Jesus, Part 2: The Praise Hymn, Part 4

I’ve decided that I’m going to do something that I’ve not done in a really long time and that is finish a series. So, if you’ve been following me for a while you’ll notice that I’ve been doing a series called, “It’s All About Jesus”. The title is self-explanatory. The material that we’ve been going over is found in Ephesians 1

“Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ. For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us for adoption to sonship through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and understanding, he made known to us the mystery of his will according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in Christ,  to be put into effect when the times reach their fulfillment—to bring unity to all things in heaven and on earth under Christ. In him we were also chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of his will, in order that we, who were the first to put our hope in Christ, might be for the praise of his glory. And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession—to the praise of his glory.” – [Ephesians 1:3-14 NIV]

According to this passage of Scripture there are nine things God has done for us and they are:

1. He has blessed us (Eph. 1:3)
2. He has chosen us (Eph. 1:4)
3. He has predestined us (Eph. 1:5, 11)
4. He has made us accepted (Eph. 1:6)
5. He has redeemed us (Eph. 1:7)
6. He has poured grace on us (Eph. 1:8)
7. He has made known unto us the mystery of His will (Eph. 1:9)
8. He has given us an inheritance (Eph. 1:11, 14)
9. He has sealed us (Eph. 1:13)

Let’s get started where we left off:

6. He has poured grace on us (Eph. 1:8)

In the ESV, Ephesians 1:7, 8 read like this:

In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace, which he lavished upon us, in all wisdom and insight – [Ephesians 1:7-8 ESV]

The word ‘lavished’ implies more than enough. It tells me that God didn’t just give me enough grace to get by on but he gave me grace for every day. He gave me more than I needed. He didn’t have to give me more than enough but he did anyway because He really loves me. Just to think that God has shown that kind of love for each and every person is incredible and unfathomable.

7. He has made known unto us the mystery of His will (Eph. 1:9)

When Paul is talking here, he’s telling us about the mystery of the will of God. How can this mystery remain a mystery if it’s made known to us? To be honest, it can’t. Paul couldn’t keep his mouth shut. He just had to talk in Ephesians 3:6:

“And the mystery is this: Because of Christ Jesus, the good news has given the Gentiles a share in the promises that God gave to the Jews. God has also let the Gentiles be part of the same body.” – [Ephesians 3:6 CEV]

We, who were rejected and kicked out in the cold, are now welcomed by God’s wonderful grace to be his elect people.

“Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy.” – [1 Peter 2:10 ESV]

8. He has given us an inheritance (Eph. 1:11, 14)

This great inheritance that Paul speaks about is our salvation. God gave this to us as a free gift. I’ve heard a lot of Baptists express this as God giving us a box wrapped in paper and all we have to do is accept it but I’m with RC Sproul on this one:

“God just doesn’t throw a life preserver to a drowning person. He goes to the bottom of the sea, and pulls a corpse from the bottom of the sea, takes him up on the bank, breathes into him the breath of life and makes him alive.” – R.C. Sproul

A dead man can’t receive anything. God has to be the one to bring you to life. Jesus says in John 10:

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.” – [John 10:10 ESV]

A lot of people use this to preach on living a blessed and abundant life. That’s all well and good but people seldom realize that you must have life before you can have abundant life and that’s what our inheritance is: life.

9. He has sealed us (Eph. 1:13)

I love what Scofield has to say about this in his commentary.

The Holy Spirit is Himself, the seal. In the symbolism of Scripture, a seal signifies:
(1) A finished transaction; (Jer_32:9); (Jer_32:10); (Joh_17:4); (Joh_19:30).
(2) Ownership; (Jer_32:11); (Jer_32:12); (2Ti_2:19).
(3) Security; (Est_8:8); (Dan_6:17); (Eph_4:30).

After reading and studying what a seal was and its purpose, I understood what Paul was communicating. Our salvation is a done deal. God owns me. I’m secure. I’m not going to lose my salvation at the drop of a hat. As a believer, I have the Holy Spirit as a testimony that God will never let me go.

I hope that God absolutely blesses your socks off today. Remember, that you are loved by the Creator of the universe.

Our Only Comfort

“For none of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself. For if we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord. So then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s.” – [Romans 14:7-8 ESV]

“What is thy only comfort in life and death? That I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Saviour Jesus Christ; who, with his precious blood, has fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me that without the will of my heavenly Father, not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation, and therefore, by his Holy Spirit, He also assures me of eternal life, and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto him.” – [The Heidelberg Catechism, Question 1]

When I was a boy, my grandmother made me a refrigerator magnet out of plastic material and yarn with a picture of a boy  holding a satchel over his shoulder and sub-caption read, “You can’t run from God.”

I believe that everything preaches a sermon and the sermon that this refrigerator magnet preached was one of the omnipresent love of God.

As I read these verses and this quote from the Heidelberg Catechism, I am reminded of the words of Fanny Crosby’s Blessed Assurance:

Blessed Assurance, Jesus is mine
O What foretaste of glory divine
Heir of salvation, purchase of God
Born of His Spirit, washed in His blood.

What a thought that we belong in life and in death. Our family and friends can go with us but when we pass from this life to the next, Jesus will still be with us.

It’s All About Jesus, Part 2: The Praise Hymn, Part 2

“Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ. For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us for adoption to sonship through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and understanding, he made known to us the mystery of his will according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in Christ,  to be put into effect when the times reach their fulfillment—to bring unity to all things in heaven and on earth under Christ. In him we were also chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of his will, in order that we, who were the first to put our hope in Christ, might be for the praise of his glory. And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession—to the praise of his glory.” – [Ephesians 1:3-14 NIV]

In the last post, we left off talking about the nine things that God has done for us through Christ’s blood.

1. He has blessed us (Eph. 1:3)
2. He has chosen us (Eph. 1:4)
3. He has predestined us (Eph. 1:5, 11)
4. He has made us accepted (Eph. 1:6)
5. He has redeemed us (Eph. 1:7)
6. He has poured grace on us (Eph. 1:8)
7. He has made known unto us the mystery of His will (Eph. 1:9)
8. He has given us an inheritance (Eph. 1:11, 14)
9. He has sealed us (Eph. 1:13)

Before we get started on Predestination, I want to finish up my thoughts about being chosen. We’ve already established that this word ‘chosen’ is an active choosing. It implies that God has chosen us out of a group. We know that the elect are chosen. What find interesting is the word for ‘chosen’ is an active choosing and the word for ‘church’ is ekklesia is ‘ones who are called out’. This is an active calling. Think about it. God has His thumb on you and He’s calling out to be separate from the influence from the world, separate from the negative influence of the culture, separate from the negative influence of society, but even an even greater scale than that, I believe that this is referring to your divine destiny. You are called and chosen to do something great for thing Kingdom of God for such a time as this. What a profound thought that everything that has happened to you whether it is good or bad has been setting you up for great things in God. You might ask me, “How can you say that something bad that’s happened to me has been setting me up?” In Romans there is a promise that all things will work together for good.

“And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.” – [Romans 8:28 KJV]

“No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.” – [Romans 8:37 ESV]

I like where Paul says at the beginning of verse 28, “we know”. He’s saying that “we are confident; we are fully convinced that God is always working and operating for the good of His people.”

I don’t mean to go all Joel Osteen on you or anything but sometimes you’ve just got to determine within your heart that everything is going to be good in the end because God loves you and He might allow bad things to happen but in the end it will all be good.

3. He has predestined us. (Ephesians 1:5, 11)

Again, this is a touchy subject for Calvinists and Arminians alike. After all of the research and studying I’ve done on it I feel like I should side with Finis Jennings Dake on the issue:

“It is God’s plan that He has foreknown and predestined, not the individual conformity of free wills to the plan. He has called all people and all are free to accept or reject the call (Jn. 3:16; 1Tim. 2:4; 2Pet. 3:9; Rev. 22:17). All who do accept, He has foreknown and predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son that His Son might be the firstborn among many brethren (Rom. 8:29). Those who reject the plan, He has foreknown and predestined to be consigned to eternal hell as an everlasting monument of His wrath on rebels (Isa. 66:22-24; Rev. 14:9-11; Mt. 25:41,46). This is the sum of foreknowledge and predestination.” – Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible

For me, personally, the issue of predestination and election is something that I keep in the open hand. I can take it or leave it. What I mean by the closed hand and open hand metaphor is this: if someone were to put a gun to my head and say, “Do you believe Jesus died on the cross for your sins?” I said “Yes” and take what was coming to me. If someone were to put a gun to my head and say, “Do you believe that man can choose whether he is saved or not?” I’d say, “Wait a minute. Let’s talk about this.” I’m willing to die for Jesus but not over my position on predestination and election. Moving on…

4. He has made us accepted. (Ephesians 1:6)

“To the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.” – [Ephesians 1:6 KJV]

I absolutely love Scofield’s position on this verse.

“Adoption (huiothesia, “placing as a son”) is not so much a word of relationship as of position. The believer’s relation to God as a child results from the new birth John 1:12, 13 whereas adoption is the act of God whereby one already a child is, through redemption from the law, placed in the position of an adult son. Gal 4:1-5 The indwelling Spirit gives the realization of this in the believer’s present experience Gal 4:6 but the full manifestation of the believer’s sonship awaits the resurrection, change, and translation of saints, which is called “the redemption of the body” Rom 8:23; 1Th 4:14-17; Eph 1:14; 1Jn 3:2” – Scofield Reference Bible

I don’t care if you’re Pentecostal or not, that ought to make you want to shout and run laps. We are not just adopted but we are made to know that we are accepted by God’s Holy Spirit that causes us to cry ‘Abba, Father’. Sometimes in families where the child is adopted they can’t sense that they don’t belong. Their adopted parents might treat them well and love them dearly but the child knows that there is something different. It’s like they have an innate feeling that those are not their biological parents but with God there is no vacant feeling. He makes feel wanted and when we become saved he plants the Holy Spirit inside to make us know that we are one of His own.

I hope this has helped you an encouraged you today. You are loved by the King of Kings! Be blessed!