A Mental Buffet // 30 Mar 2017

Mental Buffet

Some reading material for the eager mind and the hungry soul.

After Great Pain, Where Is God? – Peter Wehner

“I’m no theologian. My professional life has been focused on politics and the ideas that inform politics. Yet I’m also a Christian trying to wrestle honestly with the complexities and losses in life, within the context of my faith. And while it’s fine for Christians to say God will comfort people in their pain, if a child dies, if the cancer doesn’t go into remission, if the marriage breaks apart, how much good is that exactly?”

 

There is a Crack in Everything. That’s How the Light Gets In. – Matt Johnson

“God is at work despite the pee-drenched straw, the stubbed toes, and the waiting around in funeral parlors. When your life is in the crapper, when your church is torn apart by wolves, God is present even when you can’t see it, or feel his presence.”

 

The Plow of God – Douglas Wilson

“God plows his people. He deals with us, and He deals with us here in the Supper. He deals with sin in the Supper.”

 

John’s Love Letter’s, Part 6: Little Children

“My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments. Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.” – [1 John 2:1-6 ESV] 

Okay, so I’m not going to lie, in our last installment of the ‘John’s Love Letters’ I guess I was feeling angry at Cessationists decided that it would be a good chance to bash them (which it was) and we ended up getting off track a little, so we’re going to go over the passage again and get down to business about what John is trying to tell us.

In verse 1, he calls us “Little Children.” This isn’t to smack us around about our spiritual immaturity, this is just John’s style. He’s an old man. That’s what old people do. They call us, “Kid,” “Sport,” “Son,” and in John’s case, “Little children.” It is said that as John was dying his final words were, “Little Children, love one another.” To know everything that I know about John and then to read his letters, I think if we listen hard enough we can still hear him call us, “Little Children” and we should feel honored that such a saint refers to us as his children. It means he loves us because the Father has loved us, and for that reason he wants to lead us closer to the Father.

Next, he tells that he’s writing to us so that we may not sin, “Little Children, I am writing these things that you may not sin.” I read that and I thought, “umm… I hate to tell you this, but it’s a little late John.” I’ve messed up big time. I’ve blown it. I’m not talking about once or twice since I got saved, but I’m talking about today. But John didn’t finish there, and I’m glad he didn’t, “But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.” The word, “advocate” is legal term that says basically means that Jesus is our defense attorney. The Book of Revelation tells us that Satan is the accuser of the brethren. What that means is that Satan tries to stand before God and tell Him everything wrong we’ve done and try to give Him every reason in the book why we shouldn’t be redeemed.

That in mind, I can see Satan telling God, “Logan’s blown it! He really dropped the ball today!” And God in a condescending manner, looks at with sarcastically raised eyebrow and asks, “Well, what did he do?” Satan replies, “He lost his temper and flipped off an old lady in traffic.” God, already knowing the answer to the question, looks to Jesus, His son and my defense attorney, and asks, “Well, did he do it?” Jesus replies, “Nope.” Satan says, “But I saw him do it!” Jesus says, “I didn’t. All I saw was my perfect work accomplished, and my blood poured out over all his sins.” God dismisses the case, and that’s the end of the story. One day, Satan and his angels will be thrown into the lake of fire, and they’ll pay for all the harm that they’ve caused God’s children all the way down through history, and most of all, they’ll pay for offending Almighty God Himself.

I’ll deal with verses 3-6 again from a different angle in the next post. I’m tired. I’m going to get Chinese food, go home, and watch the first season of House. Good night, God bless, and thanks for reading.

The High Priest of Hebrews

“But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building; Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us.” – [Hebrews 9:11-12 KJV]

“But when Christ appeared as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and more perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation) he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption.” – [Hebrews 9:11-12 ESV]

“But.” this three letter word can the tone of any sentence and, if used correctly, can bring good news out of bad news. The ox ford says that this three letter word is used to introduce a phrase or clause contrasting with what has already been mentioned. In this passage of Scripture, found in the letter to the Hebrews, the writer starts describing the setup of the temple and in verse 11 he gives us the reason that we don’t have live under works and the law any more. He begins teaching us about the hope of eternal redemption through Christ’s blood. The Old Covenant system wasn’t personal enough. The Old Covenant system never dealt with the issue of your sin it only rolled it back. It didn’t have the power to give you victory over sin and relieve your conscious.

“By this the Holy Spirit indicates that the way into the holy places is not yet opened as long as the first section is still standing (which is symbolic for the present age). According to this arrangement, gifts and sacrifices are offered that cannot perfect the conscience of the worshiper, but deal only with food and drink and various washings, regulations for the body imposed until the time of reformation.”- [Hebrews 9:8-10 ESV]
“They related mainly to outward and ceremonial rites, and even when offerings were made for sin the conscience was not relieved. They could not expiate guilt; they could not make the soul pure; they could not of themselves impart peace to the soul by reconciling it to God. They could not fully accomplish what the conscience needed to have done in order to give it peace. Nothing will do this but the blood of the Redeemer…The idea here is, that those ordinances were only temporary in their nature, and were designed to endure until a more perfect system should be introduced. They were of value “to introduce” that better system; they were not adapted to purify the conscience and remove the stains of guilt from the soul.” – Albert Barnes’ Notes on the New Testament

When Christ came He made a way for us to personally go before the throne of grace and ask of Him exactly what we need. What a thought! We, a people that deserve death and Hell, have the privilege of coming before our Heavenly Father and asking for anything that we might need.

“Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.” – [Hebrews 4:14-16 KJV]

Out of this passage of Scripture I noticed three ‘T’ words that stood out to me:

1.) Touched

2.) Tempted

3.) Throne

I’ll probably post more about this later but the thought occurred to me: Jesus, our High Priest, was TEMPTED so He could be TOUCHED at the THRONE of grace.

Thank you so much for reading this. I hope you were encouraged or blessed in some way. Remember that you are loved today by the King of Kings!

 

It’s All About Jesus, Part 2: The Praise Hymn, Part 3

“Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ. For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us for adoption to sonship through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and understanding, he made known to us the mystery of his will according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in Christ,  to be put into effect when the times reach their fulfillment—to bring unity to all things in heaven and on earth under Christ. In him we were also chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of his will, in order that we, who were the first to put our hope in Christ, might be for the praise of his glory. And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession—to the praise of his glory.” – [Ephesians 1:3-14 NIV]

In the last post of this series we left off talking about how God has adopted us by making us accepted into His family. I want to continue this by talking about a subject that’s near and dear to my heart and that is redemption.

5. He has redeemed us (Ephesians 1:7)

Humanity is scarred and tainted with sin. Adam took a bite of the forbidden fruit and stained humanity with his rebellion. Since then all of humanity has been totally depraved. Before Christ saved us we were dead in our sin. I’m not sure how much the church today understands that. We were DEAD in our sin. There was nothing alive about us. An accurate picture of redemption is God taking a dead man and making him alive. RC Sproul describes this process better than I ever could.

“God just doesn’t throw a life preserver to a drowning person. He goes to the bottom of the sea, and pulls a corpse from the bottom of the sea, takes him up on the bank, breathes into him the breath of life and makes him alive.” – R.C. Sproul

Here’s a few verses in Ephesians that describe this:

“And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience– among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind.” – [Ephesians 2:1-3 ESV]

I don’t like to say that I found God or I found Christ, prefer to say He found me because I when I was dead in my sins, I was just that, dead. Dead men can’t choose anything. God had to reach below the bottom and pick me up and save me. It’s only through the atoning sacrifice of Jesus Christ do we have redemption and salvation. What I really love about Ephesians 2 is that in the first three verses Paul talks about our sinful state and in verse four he makes this transition:

“But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ–by grace you have been saved– and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.” – [Ephesians 2:4-7 ESV]

The first two words just stick out to me. “But God.” “I was headed down the wrong pathway, but God…”, “I was on my way to Hell, but God..”, “I was stuck in my sin, but God…” What a wonderful thing to know that we don’t have to have a period at end of those sentence but instead we can have a “but God…”. This is truly the story of our redemption: God bringing a dead corpse back to life by simply breathing the power of the Holy Spirit over him. I love what Adam Clarke’s Commentary says about Christian redemption.

“God has glorified his grace by giving us redemption by the blood of his Son, and this redemption consists in forgiving and delivering us from our sins; so then Christ’s blood was the redemption price paid down for our salvation: and this was according to the riches of his grace; as his grace is rich or abundant in benevolence, so it was manifested in beneficence to mankind, in their redemption by the sacrifice of Christ, the measure of redeeming grace being the measure of God’s own eternal goodness.” – Adam Clarke Commentary

I hope this has blessed you and encouraged you. Always remember that you are loved by the King of Kings and you are special in his sight.

Taking Your City

Then the LORD put forth his hand, and touched my mouth; and the LORD said unto me, Behold, I have put my words in thy mouth: see, I have this day set thee over the nations and over the kingdoms, to pluck up and to break down, and to destroy and to overthrow; to build, and to plant. – [Jeremiah 1:9-10 RV]

Good ministry through a church begins when that church determines that they are going to positively affect the culture in their area. As the body of Christ we always need to be moving, shifting, and reaching out for the sake of the gospel. As one of my dear friends in the ministry once said, ‘we must create, in out environment, a Christ-centered culture.’ The reason I chose Jeremiah 1:9, 10 as the main passage is because when God told Jeremiah that He had set him over nations and kingdoms He actually instructions: pluck up, break down, destroy, overthrow, build, and plant. The way I interpret this passage from the sentence and grammar structure is that through building and planting we will, in the process, pluck up, break down, destroy, and overthrow things that have no place in our culture. Through the courage that was built up inside Gideon, he destroyed the idols of his father (Judges 6:28-31).

We must be influential in culture because now, more than ever, we are being surrounded by a negative culture that is begging for people to conform to it’s worldly ambition and standard of living. Please understand, I am not anti-culture. I am anti-negative culture. As the church, I believe that it’s okay to take something that is positive from culture and redeem it for the preaching of the gospel. Churches do this all the time when they show clips from new movies and present the positive values that the movie teaches.

When Jesus sent out his disciples he knew that what kind of culture they would be going into. He didn’t expect them to be like the Essenes and completely avoid culture forever. He knew that the only way  to get the culture to embrace the gospel was to send them out into it.

All things considered, our objective has been and always will be to preach, pray, prophesy, heal the sick, and raise the dead.

And he said to them, “Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned. And these signs will accompany those who believe: in my name they will cast out demons; they will speak in new tongues; they will pick up serpents with their hands; and if they drink any deadly poison, it will not hurt them; they will lay their hands on the sick, and they will recover.” [Mark 16:15-18 ESV]

For more information please watch “The Elephant Room: Church in the Culture vs. Culture in the Church” on the link below:

http://marshill.com/v/b75oqkn4f75b

Our Response to His Presence, Part 2: Our Change of Identity in His Presence

“Then Abram fell on his face. And God said to him, “Behold, my covenant is with you, and you shall be the father of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be called Abram, but your name shall be Abraham, for I have made you the father of a multitude of nations.”
– [Genesis 17:3-5 ESV]

Names don’t mean a lot in our society anymore. Many times the only two requirements are that the name rolls off the tongue and it doesn’t get the child’s butt kicked in middle school. Many times the first one isn’t even a requirement that’s how you end up with names like ‘Zulu’, ‘Malik’, ‘Inigo’, ‘Ivo’, and ‘Jago’ (I’m not joking, these are real names.) In light of the value of the names of our poor children, I believe that God’s intention was for names to have a significant meaning. In Proverbs 18:21 we read that life and death are in the power of the tongue. The word ‘power’, in this verse, in the Hebrew, can mean ‘a charging force’. This means that whatever comes out of your mouth has a charging force to affect your destiny. This is why speaking the name of Jesus when we pray carries so much weight because anything we could possibly ever need is found in Him.

With this information in mind, I believe that when you name a child you speak over them a trait of their identity they must live with unless there is another spoken word over them. A prime example of this is found in Genesis 35:16-18:

“Then they journeyed from Bethel. When they were still some distance from Ephrath, Rachel went into labor, and she had hard labor. And when her labor was at its hardest, the midwife said to her, “Do not fear, for you have another son.” And as her soul was departing (for she was dying), she called his name Ben-oni; but his father called him Benjamin.”
– [Genesis 35:16-18 ESV]

As Rachel was dying, in her final fleeting moments, she named her son Ben-oni, meaning ‘son of my sorrow’, and after she died Isaac renamed him Benjamin meaning, ‘son of my right or my blessing’. If Isaac had not renamed Benjamin, then he would have had to live with the sorrow of knowing that his life brought his mother’s death and Isaac did exactly what a father should’ve done in that situation and change his son’s identity so he wouldn’t have to live with that guilt and shame.

When we know that our identity is affected by our name, we’ve got to wonder what exactly happened to Abram when his named was changed to Abraham. The name Abram means ‘high father’. It’s strange enough that he was called a father before he even had children but God knew that that wasn’t good enough. When God showed up, he changed Abram’s name to Abraham, meaning ‘father of a multitude of nations’. In the presence of God Abraham’s identity changed. He could not remain the same in the sight of God. In 1 Corinthians 13 Paul makes an amazing statement:

“For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.”
– [1 Corinthians 13:12 KJV]

I look at this verse and I think, “What are we known by?” We are known by our character. Who knows us better than we know ourselves? Our Creator. As I process all of this I am reminded of the verse in Revelation that says:

“He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who conquers I will give some of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone, with a new name written on the stone that no one knows except the one who receives it.'”
– [Revelation 2:17 ESV]

We know that that new name will indicate an identity. I believe that it will reflect the potential that God saw in us while we here on earth. While we were down here struggling, toiling, and striving over temporal things that shrink in the light of the eternal weight of the glory of God, He saw in the power that He’d given us to overcome any circumstance.

“I can do everything through Christ who strengthens me.”
– [Philippians 4:13 GW]

I hope this has blessed and encouraged you in some way, shape, or form.

“The LORD bless thee, and keep thee: The LORD make his face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee: The LORD lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.”
– [Numbers 6:24-26 RV]