The World is Not Enough // 1 John 2:15-17

1 John 2_15-17

Text: 1 John 2:15-17

Prayer of Illumination:

Almighty and Everlasting God, we are tired. We are worn down by the cares of this world, but Lord, you have told us to cast all of our cares on You because You care for us. Lord, we ask that you relieve us these cares so that we can faithfully carry your yoke. Your yoke is easy and Your burden is light. This morning, we ask that You would open up Your word to us so that it would set us free from the bondage of the world, and that we can live freely in the world that You’ve made for us. In the name of Your Son, Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen.

Introduction:

What do you think of when you think of worldliness? Do you think of wild parties? Do you think of debauchery? Do you think of rock music? What do you think worldliness really is?

Are you really safe from it just because you distance yourself from those things?

Years ago, in some churches, mostly Baptist and Pentecostal churches, when you became a member you had to commit to not dancing. You had to commit to not smoking, and in some congregations you also had to commit to not playing cards and using dice.

The problem is as long as we limit worldliness to what “those people” do “out there” then we’ll never stop and examine the worldliness that we’re actually harboring in our own hearts.

  • We’re not safe from worldliness just because we live out in the middle of nowhere where there’s more cows than people per capita.

Worldliness is more than what goes on “out there.” It’s bigger than that. It’s also what goes on, and I think as we examine the passage you’ll see what I mean.

Mixing Up Our Worlds (v. 15)

First of all, look at verse 15.

“Do not love the world or the things in the world. The love of the Father is not in those who love the world” – 1 John 2:15, NRSV

Now think about John 3:16.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.” – John 3:16, NRSV

How can God love the world and then tell us not to love the world? What’s going on? It’s the same Greek word – ‘cosmos.’ John isn’t changing the word, so what’s the deal?

The deal is the usage for ‘world’ in John 3:16 is different than the usage for ‘world’ in the 1 John 2:15.

  1. The Human Race, at large in need of redemption. (John 3:16)
    We are called to love the same people that God loves. If God loves the world in this sense, then we should also love the world. It’s our mission field. It’s the place where God has planted us. The world has God’s fingerprints all over it because every single person is made in the image of God including the people that we wish weren’t.

    • If we can’t use our power to get people to do, to act, and think like we do, then we feel like we have to do something about it. And if we can’t do something about it then we just give up and assume that we’re better than they are. Of course, we never say that out loud because that’s not polite so instead of saying it out loud we just act like we’re better. Why? Because it makes us feel good. That’s the lust of the flesh. Anything that feeds our ego. Pagan Society that is opposed to Christ’s Lordship. (1 John 5:19)
      Jesus is reigning now. His reign isn’t something we have to wait for. 1 Corinthians 15:25-26 says that Christ must reign until He puts all enemies under His feet, and the enemy to be destroyed is death. Christ is the one with all power, and all the Lordship, but the problem is that the world doesn’t recognize it because the world is held under the captivity of who John calls the evil one.

      “We know that we are God’s children, and that the whole world lies under the power of the evil one.” – 1 John 5:19, NRSV
      Call him Satan, call him Old Scratch, call him the philosophical embodiment of evil, it doesn’t matter, it’s all the same. As long as the world ignores what is true about Jesus, namely that He is Lord whether they like it or not, then they’ll always be blind and they are responsible for their blindness.

      James Montgomery Boice writes that John’s use of ‘kosmos’ in this section is in its ethical sense: “The idea here is of the world of men in rebellion against God and therefore characterized by all that is in opposition to God. This is what we might call “the world system.” It involves the world’s values, pleasures, pastimes, and aspirations. John says of this world that the world lies in the grip of the evil one (1Jn 5:19), that it rejected Jesus when He came (Jn 1:10), that it does not know Him (1Jn 3:1), and consequently that it does not know and therefore also hates His followers (John 15:18,19, 20, 21; 17:14). It is in this sense that John speaks of the world in the passage before us.”

      Our problem is that we mix up our worlds. We tend to hate the John 3:16 world while loving the 1 John 5:19 world. We end up doing that falling into the temptations that John mentions and then when others don’t agree or share the same affections that we do, we hate them.

      If you don’t think you do this then just discuss politics with someone you disagree with. You quickly forget that the person you disagree with is made in the image of God.

      It’s true that you don’t have to agree with someone to love them, but if we’re all honest then I think sometimes we tend to have a little less respect for people who aren’t like us, and I think that’s a symptom of mixing up our worlds.
      We end up loving the 1 John 5:19 world, and hating the John 3:16 world because we get just as enraged or triggered as everybody else except in the opposite direction about opposite thing realizing that there’s ditches on both sides to avoid, and a whole world of people who need the hope that is within us regardless of what ditch they’re in.

      I think the Apostle John speaks about the things that keep us from loving the John 3:16 world.

      Temptations of the World (v. 16)

      Notice verse 16. I’m actually going to look at this verse from the King James so some of the wording may be more familiar to those of us who grew up under that translation.

      “For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world.” – 1 John 2:16, KJV

      John gives us three things to look out for and he says that everything in the world, everything that is contained in a society that rebels against the rule and reign of Christ can be summed up in these three categories. And I’m actually going to start with the second of the three categories because I think this is where the downward spiral begins.

      The Lust of the Eyes – Attractions
      What looks good.

      Everything looks good when you’re on a diet. I know this because Brittany has decided to start a diet which means I’m also going on a diet. I’m told that I’ve chosen to go on this diet of my own free will and volition. I would appreciate your prayers during this trying time in my life.

      In August of 1986, Reader’s Digest published this little story: “A man was on a diet and struggling. He had to go downtown and as he started out, he remembered that his route would take him by the doughnut shop. As he got closer, he thought that a cup of coffee would hit the spot. Then he remembered his diet.

      That’s when he prayed, “Lord, if You want me to stop for a doughnut and coffee, let there be a parking place in front of the shop.” He said, “Sure enough, I found a parking place right in front—on my seventh time around the block!” As Robert Orben said, “Most people want to be delivered from temptation but would like it to keep in touch”

      Whenever you’re tempted, you’re always tempted by something that looks good at the moment. Think about compared this passage in James.

      “Blessed is anyone who endures temptation. Such a one has stood the test and will receive the crown of life that the Lord has promised to those who love him. 13No one, when tempted, should say, “I am being tempted by God”; for God cannot be tempted by evil and he himself tempts no one. 14But one is tempted by one’s own desire, being lured and enticed by it; 15then, when that desire has conceived, it gives birth to sin, and that sin, when it is fully grown, gives birth to death.” – James 1:12-15, NRSV
      Sin always starts with desire, then desire leads to disobedience, and disobedience leads to death. That’s what James 1 says. It always begins with what we think looks good.

      • We always think about lust in terms of being something purely sexual, but sometimes there are things in life that we think look good that have nothing to do with sexuality, but they always have a trap door underneath them. There’s always bad ideas that disguise themselves as good ideas.

      The Lust of the Flesh – Appetites
      What feels good.

       

      • If lust isn’t always sexual, then this idea of lust of the flesh isn’t always physical.

       

      • Good Example: On 64, the speed limit is 60 so that means I usually drive between 65 and 70. However, sometimes I’m behind someone who insists on going 20 below the speed limit. It would probably make me feel good to give them a tap on their back bumper just to give them a little encouragement, but I know as soon as I do, they may want to check their breaks, and then that would create more harm than good.

      Sometimes there are things in life that we think will make us feel better, but in end they do damage to us.

      But those are the things we crave, right? That’s what our appetite wants. Our appetite is to feed our ego. Nothing feeds our ego more than power. We want to have power.

      • If we can’t use our power to get people to do, to act, and think like we do, then we feel like we have to do something about it. And if we can’t do something about it then we just give up and assume that we’re better than they are. Of course, we never say that out loud because that’s not polite so instead of saying it out loud we just act like we’re better. Why? Because it makes us feel good. That’s the lust of the flesh. Anything that feeds our ego.


      “For by the grace given to me I say to everyone among you not to think of yourself more highly than you ought to think, but to think with sober judgment, each according to the measure of faith that God has assigned.”
      – Romans 12:3, NRSV


      The Pride of Life – Ambitions
      You hear me mention this a lot so I won’t spend a lot of time on it, but I think the American Dream is deceptive. I actually don’t think it’s a dream at all. It’s nightmare.

      Because what happens is that you start out working to make a living for you and your family which is good and honorable, but then when you realize that you’ve got a nice house, multiple cars in the driveway, and a whole bunch of other amenities you keep working even though it takes you away from your family, away from your community, away from the things that are really important because you want to keep up with the Jones’.


      • The Pride of Life is that we have to have more, more, and more, and then when you have enough it’s never really enough.

      • And I don’t think it matters where you are in society, I think at some point you have to ask yourself, “Is there anything in my life that I’m working to keep that I don’t need?” It doesn’t even have to be material things either. What’s the baggage that you’re hanging on to? What’s the biggest source of pride in your life?

        • Pride is the killer of Christian joy. Joy is all about our sense of security within our salvation, but pride is about what we’ve done, what we’ve accomplished. But in salvation, Paul says that there’s no room for boasting. You are saved by grace, not of yourselves, lest any man should boast. (Ephesians 2) If you want to separate yourself from real joy, from the joy that comes with your salvation, then allow pride to consume you.


      Alternatives to the World – Doing the Will of God (v. 17)

      Finally, notice verse 17 in our passage of 1 John 2. John gives us an alternative to the ways of the world.

      • If you’re following along in your bulletin outline the last point should say, “Alternatives to the World,” not “of the world.”


      “And the world and its desire are passing away, but those who do the will of God live forever.” – 1 John 2:17, NRSV

      There was a Christian comedian back in the 80’s who turned out to be a fraud, but he used to say something I thought was clever, he would say, “Pagans tell me all the time that Christianity is just a religion of do’s and don’t’s and I always tell them, ‘yeah, but if you spend your time doing the do’s, you won’t have time to do the don’t’s that you don’t need to do in the first place.’”

      I think that’s good practical advice, but like everything else, you have to see it in context.

      John tells us that those who do the will of God abide forever. Think about our passage this morning, 1 John 2:15-17, as a tall building. Well, like any good structure, it’s got to have a foundation.

      • By telling us to do the will of God, John tells us to aim high. Go to the very top of this building, but we can’t get to the top without starting the ground floor. The groundfloor of the building that John has given us is found right behind these verses in 1 John 2:12-14.

      “I am writing to you, little children, because your sins are forgiven on account of his name. 13I am writing to you, fathers, because you know him who is from the beginning. I am writing to you, young people, because you have conquered the evil one. 14I write to you, children, because you know the Father. I write to you, fathers, because you know him who is from the beginning. I write to you, young people, because you are strong and the word of God abides in you, and you have overcome the evil one.” – 1 John 2:12-14, NRSV
      This is what your foundation is made of.

      You can do the will of God because your sins are forgiven, and because your sins are forgiven you know God as your Father, and because you know God as your Father, Satan is a defeated enemy.

      So, what’s John talking about when he’s talking about doing the will of God? He never specifically says what it is, but if you read the entirety of chapter 2, then I think you can conclude that “doing the will of God” comes down to three things:

      1. Having your sins forgiven

        1. “My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; 2and he is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.”
          – 1 John 2:1-2, NRSV

      2. Loving one another

        1. “Whoever loves a brother or sister lives in the light, and in such a person there is no cause for stumbling. 11But whoever hates another believer is in the darkness, walks in the darkness, and does not know the way to go, because the darkness has brought on blindness.”
          – 1 John 2:10-11, NRSV

      3. Doing what is right.

        1. “If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who does right has been born of him.” – 1 John 2:29, NRSV

      You may hear that and think, “Well, that’s really broad, he’s not giving us enough information.” Actually, that’s the point. John is giving you all the information you need.

      • This is good news because this means that Christianity isn’t as complicated as we want to make it out to be. We don’t have to go on some crusade. We don’t have to legislate people’s behavior. We just have to our sins forgiven, love God, love each other, and do what is right, and then let God do the rest.

      And you know what the best part is. That first one has already been done for us. Remember what John says, “Your sins are forgiven.”

      Conclusion

      If your sins are forgiven, then you have citizenship in a kingdom that is not of this world which means that the cares of this world do not belong to you. They are not yours to deal with. So, this morning if you feel weighed down, if you feel like you’ve spent too long worrying about things that don’t belong to you, if you feel like you would like to love Jesus more, then talk to Him this morning.

Ministry Matters: Realism & Optimism // 2 Corinthians 4:7-15

Ministry Matters 2

Text: 2 Corinthians 4:7-15

This morning we’re going to continue our series entitled, “Ministry Matters” by looking at the Apostle Paul’s perspective of his ministry.

Normally, I don’t like checklists, but I think the one we’re going to have this morning is going to be helpful. All I really want us to do is walk through the text and see what Paul says about his own ministry that he’s been given and I want us to apply that to the ministry that we’ve been given.

Ministry isn’t just for the pastor, it’s not just for those that have been ordained as elders. Ministry is for every single person that has been born again. Paul goes on to explain this later in 2 Corinthians 5:18-19.

“Now all things are of God, who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation, 19that is, that God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imputing their trespasses to them, and has committed to us the word of reconciliation.” – 2 Corinthians 5:18-19, NKJV

The word ‘reconciliation’ means ‘to bring together’ so our job is to go out and let people know that God has come down to where we are in Christ for the purpose of closing the gap that stands between God and man.

  • And according to what we just read, God has committed this task to us. So, God volunteered you for this work.

  • Don’t you just love it when people volunteer you for stuff? “I told [so and so] you’d be more than happy to so that for them.” Well, this is what God did when he saved you. He volunteered you for a work. He put you where you are (the neighborhood you live in, the job where you work, the people you interact with), God put you where you are so that you can improve the lives of others by telling and living out the word of reconciliation.

And I think our text this morning in 2 Corinthians 4 tells us how we should view that task.

Be Realistic About Who You Are, But Optimistic About Who God is (v. 7)

“But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellence of the power may be of God and not of us.” – 2 Corinthians 4:7, NKJV

The Vessel
Listen, you are not that great… but God is.
You are weak, but He’s strong.
You are frail, He’s mighty.
In the places where you fail, God shows His power.

That’s what Paul is getting at.

“The pottery lamps which could be bought for a copper or two in the Corinthian market-place provided a sufficient analogy; it did not matter how cheap or fragile they were so long as they showed the light.”[1] – F. F. Bruce

“The marvel of Paul’s statement is not to be overlooked. The gospel minister is a vessel made of common, run-of-the-mill clay—fragile and easily broken. And yet God has entrusted the treasure of the gospel to such a vessel… Why does God do this? According to Paul, he does it to show that this all-surpassing power is from God and not from us. God uses what is fragile and yet serviceable so that there might be no mistaking the origin of the gospel minister’s power.”[2]
– The IVP New Testament Commentary

One of the most striking things to me about the commentary is where the author says, “God uses what is fragile yet serviceable.”

  • Other than God, no one knows your brokenness like you do.
  • You’re the one that has to live with your own dark thoughts.
  • You’re the one that really knows all the pain that you’re feeling.
  • You’re the one that knows your struggles with your own sinful nature, and even more so, God knows all of that too, and as long as you’re serviceable, God will use you, and He will use you to pour that treasure that’s in you into another broken and fragile vessel.

It’s okay to be honest about who you are. Paul was even honest about who he was. In Romans 7, he kept saying over and over again that the good that he wanted to do, he couldn’t do, and the evil he wanted to refrain from doing, he did anyway. And he didn’t understand it, but he finally broke down and said, “but thank God I have victory because there is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ.” (Romans 7:25-8:1)

So, you have to be honest about who you are, but you also have to be optimistic about who God is. Paul says that the whole reason God puts His treasure in broken and fragile vessels is so that people don’t get confused about which is more valuable – the vessel or the content.

This is why John says, “greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world.” (1 John 4:4)

The Content
If you were to read and follow Paul’s logic, you would see that the treasure that Paul specifically says is inside of us is “the light of the knowledge of the glory of God” mentioned in verse 6.

That’s what it all comes down to. God has given us the light of the knowledge of the Gospel and that’s what makes us valuable.

Last week when we looked at Nicodemus in John 3, he didn’t have this kind of knowledge that Paul talks about. He has his own knowledge based only off of what he could see. Remember, he said, “We know you are a teacher sent from God,” but what he didn’t know is that Jesus was the Son of the Living God, and that kind of knowledge can’t be seen by simply observing Jesus’ miracles, it has to be given to someone by the Father. That’s why when Peter gives his confession, Jesus tells him, “Blessed are you, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven.” (Matthew 16:17)

Peter had seen the miracles, but that’s not what convinced him, it was knowledge and faith that had been imparted to him by the Father.

And that’s the treasure that God puts inside of us, and that’s more valuable than anything this world can offer us.

Not only should we be realistic about who we are and optimistic about who God is, but we should also be realistic about our circsumstances and optimistic about the outcome.

Be Realistic About Your Circumstances, but Optimistic About the Outcome (v. 8-9)

Notice the things that Paul says, “We are hard-pressed… we are perplexed… we are persecuted…. Struck down.”

That’s real. He’s being honest. And I feel like sometimes we’re afraid to be this honest because if we do, we’ll have some prosperity-preaching evanjellyfish say, “Now, you can’t say that, your words have power and you have to speak life and think happy thoughts.”

Paul really was in trouble, he shipwrecked several times, people were out to kill him, he was imprisoned several times. But throughout everything, he could still say that he wasn’t crushed, he wasn’t in despair, he wasn’t forsaken, and he wasn’t destroyed.

It’s okay. We can be honest and say that we live in a post-Christian society. This might have been a predominantly Christian nation at one time, but it’s not now. We can admit there are Christians dying overseas for their faith, but we have to have hope and believe that it’s not always going to be that way.

  • We already believe that one day God will make everything new, but do we believe that God is already in the process of doing that? We should.

  • The end times didn’t begin when John Darby came up with that dispensationalism stuff, the end times began with the resurrection of Jesus because the resurrection of Jesus is God’s promise that everything will be made new, and death will not have the final word, but resurrection will.

“The resurrection of the Lord Jesus was no isolated event. His return from the dead brought with it, in principle, the resurrection of all things from the dead. The power of death, which had held the entire world in thrall, was reversed at that point, two millennia ago, and the power of His new life has since then been working through the world, the way yeast works through a loaf of bread. For this reason, we are children of hope.”[3] – Douglas Wilson, Heaven Misplaced

And so we are children of hope, and we are (or at least we should be) optimistic about the outcome of God’s work through us in the world, but in the meantime it looks dark, but the darkness is only temporary, and if you’re a Christian then things are already looking brighter.

It’s easy to see all the things that are wrong with the world, but if you can’t see that God is at work then you’re not trying to look hard enough.

  • One of the oldest abortion clinics in Ohio shut down this week, and it looks like more in that state may close down soon too. [4]

Clearly, we see God at work, and we don’t have to wait until the return of Christ to see things turn around. We can experience renewal now. It all starts with God opening our eyes to see the kingdom at work, and to see that we are the workers of the kingdom.

Be Realistic About Death, but Optimistic About Life. (v. 10-15)

Notice, what Paul says right after he says that we are struck down, but not destroyed.

“always carrying about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body. 11For we who live are always delivered to death for Jesus’ sake, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. 12So then death is working in us, but life in you.

13And since we have the same spirit of faith, according to what is written, “I believed and therefore I spoke,” we also believe and therefore speak, 14knowing that He who raised up the Lord Jesus will also raise us up with Jesus, and will present us with you. 15For all things are for your sakes, that grace, having spread through the many, may cause thanksgiving to abound to the glory of God.”
– 2 Corinthians 4:10-15, NKJV

Paul says that as we work for the Lord under these circumstances, then death works in us, but not only does death work in us, life is at work in those around us because as I mentioned earlier, death doesn’t have the final word, resurrection does.

Simply put: our suffering gives life to others.

Think about the suffering of Job. We just studied Elijah on Wednesday nights. Think about all the of the Apostles being slaughtered for the Gospel. I mentioned Paul’s sufferings earlier.

Why is it they suffered the things that they did? It’s so that we could recall their personal pain and glean life from it.

And since you’re a witness to Christ, your suffering can be a conduit of life for someone else.

    • But I’m going to add this as a caveat – If you’re going to suffer then do so for the right reasons. Suffer over the things that matter, and here’s what I mean by that.

    • I’m thinking of 1 Peter 2:18-20, and Peter is addressing people who are employed as bondservants.

 

  • “You who are slaves must submit to your masters with all respect. Do what they tell you—not only if they are kind and reasonable, but even if they are cruel. 19For God is pleased when, conscious of his will, you patiently endure unjust treatment. 20Of course, you get no credit for being patient if you are beaten for doing wrong. But if you suffer for doing good and endure it patiently, God is pleased with you.” – 1 Peter 2:18-20, NLT

 

To show you the modern application, imagine Peter is talking to you as an employee, and imagine the master mentioned here is your employer, and since your employer can’t beat you like a master could beat a bond-servant, imagine that he reprimands you.

So, Peter says, “If you’re suffering because you’re doing the right thing, then God is pleased, but if you’re suffering because you’re being stupid then you deserve it.”

With that caveat in mind, make sure that you’re suffering for something that’s important because that’s the only kind of suffering that people can glean life from.

On my bookshelf, I have a two volume set of books about martyrs. It’s called, “Jesus Freaks.” And one of my favorite stories is about Saint Maria of Paris.

  • Mary Skobtsova (a.k.a. Saint Maria of Paris) made a rented house in Paris her “convent.” It was a place with open doors for people who were escaping from Nazi Germany and other refugees. It was also the center for service to the poor and needy, and theological discussion. In Saint Maria’s eyes theology and service went hand in hand.

    After the fall of France in 1940, many Jews came asking to receive baptismal certificates, but she and Fr. Dimitri Klepinin were eventually caught and arrested by the Gestapo. She was sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp. On Holy Saturday, 1945, she failed a selection and was sent to the gas chamber to die.

One of her last prayers was, “Lord, I am your messenger. Throw me like a blazing torch into the night.” That’s the kind of determination we need if we’re going to lights in the world.

I realize that it hasn’t been very long this morning, but I feel like we’ve been equipped. We’ve been fed by Jesus at His table, and we have read God’s Word. We’re ready to face the world until we meet again next week.

I’m going to pray for us, and we’re going to sing one more hymn.

Closing Prayer

Heavenly Father, You are so kind to us. We are cracked earthen vessels and you fill us treasure from Your storehouse and then you tells us to out and pour into other earthen vessels the gift You’ve freely given to us. We ask You to make pliable before You so that You can use us to bring life to others and bring glory to Your name. In the name of Your Son, Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen.

_____

[1] Bruce, F. F. New Century Bible Commentary. Wm B Eerdmans, 1980.

[2] The IVP New Testament Commentary. InterVarsity Press, 1994.

[3] Heaven misplaced: Christ’s kingdom on earth Douglas Wilson – Canon Press – 2011

[4] “Ohio’s First Abortion Company Closing Columbus Facility After Long Sordid History – Standard Newswire.” Was Dorothy Day a ‘Dissenting Catholic?’ – Standard Newswire, standardnewswire.com/news/95261

The Ultimate Distraction of the Digital Age

technologyquote1As great as the advent of technology and social media is, it has distracted us from our own devotional time with God, and I’m not even talking about basic Bible reading and “quiet time.” I mean that it has distracted us from the reality of our own sin.

We see some injustice happening across the world and we think it’s our duty to start some holy war on social media when we can’t even declare war on our flesh. All it is is one giant distraction. If the devil can keep you focused on all the wars, rumors of wars, crimes, and heresies taking place then that means less time for you to spend working on your bitterness problem or your unforgiveness issue.
The reality of the situation is this: the news is so depressing that if you keep watching it and following it, you’ll allow yourself to become jaded, bitter, depressed, and sometimes even nihilistic all in the name of “being an informed citizen.” So, for God’s sake, turn off your TV, take a break from Fox News, and just meditate on God’s Word.
This is something that I’ve noticed in my own life so let me confess my sins. I make a habit of trying to stay informed so I’ll sit in the living room and watch Fox News or TheBlaze and I will just listen to all the terrible things going, and unless I stop myself, I will become angry, scared, and worried over issues that I have no direct control over. When I feel this way, instead of praying or reading the Word, I lash out on social media. What good does it do? None at all.

So, here’s my challenge to you as someone who also struggles with this: shut everything out for a while, listen to some psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, just read the Bible, and meditate deeply on the Word and rest in His promises.

A Scriptural Response to Charleston

charleston3My heart is broken for the families of the victims of this atrocious massacre, but in light of this horrific incident, the families are practicing what they’ve heard preached their whole lives – forgiveness.

Business Insider reports the following:

“Family members of those killed during a bible study at a historically black church in South Carolina Wednesday night were given the chance to speak to their loved ones’ alleged killer during his bond hearing today.

“Although my grandfather and the other victims died at the hands of hate … they [the victims] lived in love,” Alana Simmons, the granddaughter of Reverend Daniel Simmons, said in court.

“Their legacies will live in love so hate won’t win,” Simmons said.

So, how do we respond? I and many of my readers live in Arkansas. We can’t physically be there for the city of Charleston, and even if we could, what could we possibly do? The damage has already been done. So, today I want to talk what we can do now to show the sincerity of our love for Charleston as the city goes through this time of mourning and loss.

I believe our response should be one of love, prayer, and forgiveness with a full recognition of Jesus Christ as our Prince of Peace.

Love
The Bible clearly teaches that our love should be unconditional. If you don’t believe me read 1st Corinthians 13:1-13 and 1st John 3:10-18. As a matter of fact, read the entirety of Scripture and show me one place where God gives us one excuse for us, as His New Covenant people, not to love freely, unconditionally, and sacrificially. So, whom do we love? We love the people of Charleston. We love the friends and families of the victims, and we love people like Dylann Roof. That’s hard to say and probably hard for you to read, but let’s examine the words of Scripture:

“If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. 33And if you do good to those who do good to you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. 34And if you lend to those from whom you expect to receive, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, to get back the same amount. 35But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return, and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, for he is kind to the ungrateful and the evil. 36Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.” – Luke 6:32-36, ESV

Jesus makes no qualms about it. “Love your enemies.” Now, more than ever, the words of our Savior should be ringing our hearts and our minds. We know the victims showed loved and affection for Dylann Roof when he walked through the doors of their church by this report from the article mentioned earlier:

“The mother of the youngest victim, 26-year old Tywanza Sanders, told Roof that “every fiber in my body hurts, I will never be the same.”

“As we said in the Bible study, we enjoyed you,” she said. “But may God have mercy on you.”

I watched the coverage on Fox Business of Roof’s bond hearing, and I heard only a portion of the hurt in Sander’s voice as she spoke these words, and the friends and families of the victims say that the congregation completely welcomed Roof as soon as he walked in. They had no idea who he was. They just wanted to love him as they had been loved by God, and that’s what we need to do, love.

Prayer
We need to pray for peace for Charleston, we need to pray for comfort for the families, we need to pray for racial reconciliation, and we must pray for our enemies. Again let’s turn to the words of Jesus:

“You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ 44But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47And if you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? 48You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” – Matthew 5:43-48, ESV

Let’s think about this just for a second. Why do we have enemies? Why do we have people like Dylann Roof who hate and express that hate through violence and bigotry? Why did Adolf Hitler persecute the Jews? Because Satan hates what God loves, and sin stands directly against anything that God ordained as good and holy. So,if God loves racial harmony and racial unity (and we know that He does), then sin causes people to hate God and everything that He loves including racial harmony and racial unity. We know that God loves these things because He sent His son to die for people of all races, creeds, and nationalities. If you don’t believe me, then let’s look at the book at the Book of Revelation:

“And between the throne and the four living creatures and among the elders I saw a Lamb standing, as though it had been slain, with seven horns and with seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent out into all the earth. 7And he went and took the scroll from the right hand of him who was seated on the throne. 8And when he had taken the scroll, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each holding a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. 9And they sang a new song, saying, “Worthy are you to take the scroll and to open its seals, for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation, 10and you have made them a kingdom and priests to our God, and they shall reign on the earth.” – Revelation 5:6-10, ESV

This passage points us to a time when racism, sexism, and all of the other “isms” are no more, and it points to people that were redeemed by the shed blood of Jesus. All peoples of every tribe, nation, and tongue are singing to the sovereign Lord of the Universe. This is real racial harmony because this is when all earthly races become one race, God’s chosen race, His redeemed people.

So, when we go back to Jesus telling us to pray for our enemies, He tells us how to pray in Matthew 6:5-13, and finally He gives us the confidence to pray this way in Mark 11:23-24 when He says that “whatever you ask in prayer, believe… and it will be yours.” So, what should we pray? We pray for the salvation of Dylann Roof and those like Him, but we pray ultimately that God will have His way with him.

One of two things will happen by the end of Roof’s life, He will either stand before God justified by grace, through faith in Jesus Christ, or He will stand condemned, under the kindled hot wrath of Almighty God as servant of sin. And either way, God will have had His way with him. What he did was horrible beyond description, but when he stands before the judgement bar, only God can judge him and we must come to terms with that.

Forgiveness
“For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, 15but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.” – Matthew 6:14-15, ESV

I want you to notice something in this passage. Jesus doesn’t put any conditions on forgiveness. He doesn’t say, “Wait until the offending party asks for forgiveness.” He simply commands us to forgive others their trespasses regardless of the act, regardless of whether they ask for it, and especially regardless of whether or not they deserve it. Our whole motivation for forgiveness to see how much God has forgiven us in Christ (Ephesians 4:31-32).

The families of the victims have shared the Gospel and extended forgiveness to Dylan Roof, and I truly believe that the Bible commands us to do the same. The Christian Post stated that a gospel musician by the name of Marcus Stanley left a message on Roof’s Facebook before it was taken down for security reasons, and in a portion of the message Stanley gave an invitation to accept Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior.

“If you’re still out there… Give your heart to Jesus and confess your sins with a heart of forgiveness. He is the only one that can save your soul and forgive you for this terrible act that you have done.” Stanley then added, “I love you Dylann … even in the midst of the darkness and pain you’ve caused. But more importantly, He loves you.”

A Need For the Prince of Peace
The prophet Isaiah proclaims that Jesus will come as the Prince of Peace. Paul tells us in Ephesians 2:14 says that Jesus is our peace because He breaks down racial, cultural, and national barriers and brings near the throne of His grace by His blood.

We live in a broken world. What happened at Charleston is proof of that (as if we needed more proof). Only Jesus can bring peace to all the futile racial wars that fallen man fights. His redemption by His destroyed all walls and beckons us to a life of love and Christian unity.

“Not color but faith in Christ is the mark of the kingdom. But it is a mighty long journey. And the price is high. Jesus was on the Calvary road every step of the way. He knew what it woud finally cost Him. It would cost Him His life. But His heart was in it. To the end.” – John Piper, Bloodlines

Charleston needs Jesus. Dylan Roof needs Jesus. I need Jesus. You need Jesus. This world needs Jesus.

Sermon Notes: “How Majestic Is Your Name”

Hey Guys,
These are some sermon notes from a message I preached at Newton Springs Full Gospel Church in Hector, Arkansas about a year and a half ago. This isn’t meant to be a transcript just some verses, quotes, and thoughts I jotted down to preach from. You’re welcome to use this for personal or group Bible study, or to even preach from. Just give God the credit for it, since He’s the One who gave it anyway. Soli Deo Gloria!

How Majestic is Your Name
“O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth! who hast set thy glory above the heavens. [2] Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger. [3] When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; [4] What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? [5] For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour. [6] Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet: [7] All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field; [8] The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas. [9] O LORD our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!” 

– [Psalms 8:1-9 KJV]

2 Purposes For This Psalm:
1. To Make Us See How Sufficient God is
2. To Make Us See How Insufficient We Are

1. To Make Us See How Sufficient God is
“O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth! You have set your glory above the heavens.”
– [Psalm 8:1 ESV]

“O LORD, our Lord…” – YAHWEH our Adonai Just in this little fragment of the first verse two big truths are presented. Almighty God is lord of the universe and He is Lord over the Church.

LORD – All caps means Yahweh (I AM WHO I AM, Exodus 3:14).
He is self-sustaining, all powerful, all knowing, all sovereign, king of the Universe. He doesn’t need our help. He doesn’t our opinion. He doesn’t need our input. He is God all by Himself and that’s the end of it.

“When God says I AM WHO I AM, he summons us to humble objectivity. He puts an end to the notion that everybody’s view of God is as good as everybody else’s. God is who he is and nobody’s opinion of him makes any difference. Therefore, our calling as His creatures is to strive to know him for who he is, not for who we would like him to be. ” – John Piper, Sermon: “I AM WHO I AM”

The idols of the Old Testament had to be built and created from the ideas of men by the hands of men, but the very men that created those idols were formed by the hand of the God they denied.

“Thus saith the LORD, Learn not the way of the heathen, and be not dismayed at the signs of heaven; for the heathen are dismayed at them. For the customs of the people are vain: for one cutteth a tree out of the forest, the work of the hands of the workman, with the axe. They deck it with silver and with gold; they fasten it with nails and with hammers, that it move not. They are upright as the palm tree, but speak not: they must needs be borne, because they cannot go. Be not afraid of them; for they cannot do evil, neither also is it in them to do good…But the LORD is the true God, he is the living God, and an everlasting king: at his wrath the earth shall tremble, and the nations shall not be able to abide his indignation.” – [Jeremiah 10:2-5, 10 KJV]

“Our God is in the heavens; he does all that he pleases. Their idols are silver and gold, the work of human hands. They have mouths, but do not speak; eyes, but do not see. They have ears, but do not hear; noses, but do not smell. They have hands, but do not feel; feet, but do not walk; and they do not make a sound in their throat. Those who make them become like them; so do all who trust in them.” – [Psalms 115:3-8 ESV]

“Descend, if you will, into the lowest depths of the ocean, where undisturbed the water sleeps, and the very sand is motionless in unbroken quiet, but the glory of the Lord is there, revealing its excellence in the silent palace of the sea.” – Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David

He is Creator of the Universe (Genesis 1:1; Colossians 1:16)
“A state of mind that sees God in everything is evidence of growth in grace and a thankful heart.” – Charles G. Finney

“Lift up your eyes on high and see: who created these? He who brings out their host by number, calling them all by name, by the greatness of his might, and because he is strong in power not one is missing.” – [Isaiah 40:26 ESV]

He is Sustainer of the Universe (Colossians 1:17)
“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. [16] For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. [17] And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together.” – [Colossians 1:15-17 ESV]

“The meaning is, that they are kept in the present state; their existence, order, and arrangement are continued by his power. If unsupported by him, they would fall into disorder, or sink back to nothing.” – Albert Barnes

Literally, if Christ were not holding the universe together then the earth and all of creation would fall and sink back into the dark abysmal void that it was found in in Genesis 1:2, “The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep…” I am held together in the very same way.

If Christ should take His hand off of me then I would slip back into the dark sin and despair that He found me in, but because He is still holding the world in place I know that He will still hold me in place. He has sealed me to the day of redemption (Ephesians 4:30).I cannot hold myself together. I am held together by the fact that Christ holds the universe together and He is Lord over all.

2. How Insufficient We Are
When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars, which you have set in place, what is man that you are mindful of him, and the son of man that you care for him? – [Psalms 8:3-4 ESV]

God has no reason to be mindful of us because we’ve willingly sinned against him.

“for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,” – [Romans 3:23 ESV]

“Behold, the LORD’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear; but your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear.” – [Isaiah 59:1-2 ESV]

He doesn’t leave us in a hopeless and helpless state. He sends a Redeemer to save us!

“And a Redeemer will come to Zion, to those in Jacob who turn from transgression,” declares the LORD. “And as for me, this is my covenant with them,” says the LORD: “My Spirit that is upon you, and my words that I have put in your mouth, shall not depart out of your mouth, or out of the mouth of your offspring, or out of the mouth of your children’s offspring,” says the LORD, “from this time forth and forevermore.” – [Isaiah 59:20-21 ESV]

CONCLUSION
“The only thing of our very own which we contribute to our salvation is the sin which makes it necessary.” – William Temple “We sinned for no reason but an incomprehensible lack of love, and He saved us for no reason but an incomprehensible excess of love.” ― Peter Kreeft, Jesus-Shock

We need Jesus to save us and sustain. We can’t do this ourselves.

“For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.” – [Ephesians 2:8-9 ESV]

Our sin has separated us from us from God and we need Him to saturate with His love and His Spirit and bring us into right relationship with Him. We can’t go to church enough. We can’t do enough good works. We can’t knock on enough doors. We can’t sing enough hymns during the congregational singing. Only the grace of God can bring us to life in Him. We need Jesus. It’s that simple.

John’s Love Letter’s, Part 6: Little Children

“My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. And by this we know that we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments. Whoever says “I know him” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him, but whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.” – [1 John 2:1-6 ESV] 

Okay, so I’m not going to lie, in our last installment of the ‘John’s Love Letters’ I guess I was feeling angry at Cessationists decided that it would be a good chance to bash them (which it was) and we ended up getting off track a little, so we’re going to go over the passage again and get down to business about what John is trying to tell us.

In verse 1, he calls us “Little Children.” This isn’t to smack us around about our spiritual immaturity, this is just John’s style. He’s an old man. That’s what old people do. They call us, “Kid,” “Sport,” “Son,” and in John’s case, “Little children.” It is said that as John was dying his final words were, “Little Children, love one another.” To know everything that I know about John and then to read his letters, I think if we listen hard enough we can still hear him call us, “Little Children” and we should feel honored that such a saint refers to us as his children. It means he loves us because the Father has loved us, and for that reason he wants to lead us closer to the Father.

Next, he tells that he’s writing to us so that we may not sin, “Little Children, I am writing these things that you may not sin.” I read that and I thought, “umm… I hate to tell you this, but it’s a little late John.” I’ve messed up big time. I’ve blown it. I’m not talking about once or twice since I got saved, but I’m talking about today. But John didn’t finish there, and I’m glad he didn’t, “But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous.” The word, “advocate” is legal term that says basically means that Jesus is our defense attorney. The Book of Revelation tells us that Satan is the accuser of the brethren. What that means is that Satan tries to stand before God and tell Him everything wrong we’ve done and try to give Him every reason in the book why we shouldn’t be redeemed.

That in mind, I can see Satan telling God, “Logan’s blown it! He really dropped the ball today!” And God in a condescending manner, looks at with sarcastically raised eyebrow and asks, “Well, what did he do?” Satan replies, “He lost his temper and flipped off an old lady in traffic.” God, already knowing the answer to the question, looks to Jesus, His son and my defense attorney, and asks, “Well, did he do it?” Jesus replies, “Nope.” Satan says, “But I saw him do it!” Jesus says, “I didn’t. All I saw was my perfect work accomplished, and my blood poured out over all his sins.” God dismisses the case, and that’s the end of the story. One day, Satan and his angels will be thrown into the lake of fire, and they’ll pay for all the harm that they’ve caused God’s children all the way down through history, and most of all, they’ll pay for offending Almighty God Himself.

I’ll deal with verses 3-6 again from a different angle in the next post. I’m tired. I’m going to get Chinese food, go home, and watch the first season of House. Good night, God bless, and thanks for reading.

John’s Love Letters, Part 2: God is Light

This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. -1 John 1:5 ESV

God is light.

This simple statement is gospel for those in darkness.

If you’re in darkness and you’ve never seen light, then you would have no idea what darkness was or even that you lived in darkness. It’s not until the light comes in and actually shows you what darkness is or even the evil things that the darkness is hiding from you do you realize that there is even something other than darkness.

One commentator writes the following,

“It is the property of light to discover all things; and it is perfectly pure and incapable of pollution: when therefore it is said, that “God is light,” we must understand it as designating… Light is perhaps the only thing which is incapable of being polluted; and therefore is peculiarly fit to represent the immaculate purity of God.” – Charles Simeon’s Horae Homileticae

I heard a theologian make an analogy very similar to this one,

When you’re in a completely dark room, you might find something that feels soft and cuddly. You’re convinced it’s harmless. How can something this soft and loveable be this bad, right? But then, one day, someone comes to the door of that room and invites you to come out from the room. You decline on the grounds that you want to stay in the room and cuddle with this thing you’ve found in the dark, but then the person inviting you out of the room opens the door, and shines a light inside the room revealing the thing to which you’ve been clinging to was the leg of a humongous spider knitting it’s web of destruction for you. All this time the darkness was hiding from you the thing that could’ve killed you.

This is what God does for us. He sheds light on our sin.

Still there are those that have not seen their sin for the death that it is. For them, their end is destruction, misery, and judgment. Only God can shine the revealing light of Christ upon their hearts.

Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. -John 3:18 ESV

We sometimes wonder if our darkness is too dark for God. We never consciously think that or even say it, but we live out that thought by running away from God because of our sin rather than running to God asking Him to take it from us.

The first part of John 3:18 tells us that whoever believes in Him is not condemned. So what must you believe? Simply believe that He is light and that He exposes and rescues from darkness.

Run to Jesus and repent.

“If from the lips of Jesus thou dost never drink sweet honey—if thou art not like the bee, which [sips] sweet luscious liquor from the Rose of Sharon, then out of the selfsame mouth there shall go forth against thee a two-edged sword; and that mouth from which the righteous draw their bread, shall be to thee the mouth of destruction and the cause of thine ill.” – Charles Spurgeon