Sabbath Rest and Common Grace From the Front Porch

From where I’m sitting, on the front porch of my Grandparent’s house in Dover, Arkansas, the earth moves slower. The sun rises and sets slower here than anywhere else. It is here on this front porch in this rural community where I see God’s common grace the most. If there was ever a place exemplified sabbath rest, it’s here. It is an atmosphere of peace, solitude, and rest that seems to melt away the cares of this veil. It is a healthy and wholesome thing for every person to have a place like this to think, to pray, to focus, to gather, and to regroup. So, my question to you is this: where is your place like this? Where is your place to sit and solve the world’s problems? Where is your place to rest and get away for awhile? Did you know that the Bible actually commands rest?

 

“Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” – [Exodus 20:8-11 ESV]

 

And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath.” – [Mark 2:27 ESV]

 

I believe that rest in and of itself is a form of common grace. Why? Because everyone enjoys rest at some point. It’s a universal concept enjoyed by converted and the unconverted alike. Even workaholics have to sleep sometime and whether they want to admit it or not, they enjoy the feeling of their head hitting the cool side of the pillow. Why do we need a sabbath rest? Because we’re only human. The sin nature that we inherited from our father Adam causes work to be toilsome and as a result, our bodies ache and become sore. If we overwork our bodies, they get hurt, bones break, muscles get torn, and so forth. Because we are sinful, we have one of two equally sinful extremes that we revert to in response to work. We either avoid work altogether and become lazy, or we go overboard and work ourselves to death without ever resting. Albert Barnes’ gives a picture of what it looks like to rest biblically without being lazy.

 

For his rest from toil, his rest from the cares and anxieties of the world, to give him an opportunity to call off his attention from earthly concerns and to direct it to the affairs of eternity. It was a kind provision for man that he might refresh his body by relaxing his labors; that he might have undisturbed time to seek the consolations of religion to cheer him in the anxieties and sorrows of a troubled world; and that he might render to God that homage which is most justly due to him as the Creator, Preserver, Benefactor, and Redeemer of the world.”
– Albert Barnes’ Notes on the New Testament (On Mark 2:27)

 

There’s a quote from Perry Noble that I think is very applicable here. “Refusing to work is lazy, refusing to rest is disobedient.” We commit sin when we take it upon ourselves to work beyond the physical limitations that God has set for our bodies. Sometimes we need to rest and in our resting, give glory to God who gave us the ability to work and rest.

 

It’s All About Jesus, Part 1: The Christ Hymn

“The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.” – [Colossians 1:15-20 NIV]

This section of Scripture found in Colossians is often referred to, by many Scholars, as ‘The Christ Hymn’ because many scholars believe that it was sung during worship in the early church. The origin of this hymn is not known but some think that it came from various sources ranging from the Stoic persuasion to the Hellenistic-Jewish persuasion. Regardless of it’s origin, it declares the preeminence and supremacy in Christ in all things. What we have here is one of the finest descriptions of who Jesus is that we can find in the Bible. In one of his sermons, Louie Giglio calls this the hymn of all creation.

       1. The Preeminence of Christ in Creation (1:15-17)

Verse 15 starts off by telling of His heavenly origin. We find in Romans 8:29, Paul calls Jesus the first born among many brethren and now in Colossians Paul goes deeper and says that Jesus is the first born among all of creation. According to Adam Clarke, “The phraseology is Jewish; and as they apply it to the Supreme Being merely to denote his eternal pre-existence, and to point him out as the cause of all things; it is most evident that St. Paul uses it in the same way.”

Laminin

In verse 16, we see that the writer of this hymn emphasizes the work of creation in powers and authorities and makes it known that all of these things, whether upon the earth or dwelling heavenly realms, were created for the glory and supremacy of Christ. Everything that God does will bring glory to Him in some way, shape, or form. In Isaiah when God says that no word will go forth void (Isaiah 55:10-11) he means that everything he speaks is for a specific time and purpose and, it will accomplish that purpose in it’s appointed time. Going back to verse 16, everything was created for a specific time and purpose.

In verse 17, Paul says that Christ is before all things. This phrase reaffirms verse 15 where it speaks about Christ being the firstborn among all of creation. In the latter part of this verse shows us that in Christ all things hold together. We find here the Greek word synesteken, meaning that connotes preservation or coherence. In the RSV reading of this verse it says, “in Him all things consist.” This verse is truer than what we might think. In our bodies there is a cell membrane called, Laminin. I’ve posted about this topic before. According to Wikipedia, “The laminins are a family of glycoproteins that are an integral part of the structural scaffolding in almost every tissue of an organism. They are secreted and incorporated into cell-associated extracellular matrices. Laminin is vital for the maintenance and survival of tissues.” Without these laminins, our limbs would literally fall apart. What’s even more amazing is that these laminins are in the shape of a cross. The writer was scarily accurate in saying that in Christ, all things hold together!

     2. The Preeminence of Christ in the Church

Paul starts off in verse 18 by discussing Christ’s function as head of the church. Dr. Augustus Neander says, “The Church is His body by virtue of His entering into communion corporeally with human nature.” This proves the idea that Paul wants his readers to know that Christ exercises his authority in the universe through the church. In verse 18, Paul notes that he is the firstborn from among dead meaning that he is the only to rise from dead and die no more (as opposed to Lazarus who died a second after being raised form the dead in John 11) so that, once again Christ might have supremacy and preeminence in all things thus proving that Christ is sovereign over the living as well as the dead.

In verse 19, Paul explains that it pleased God for his fullness to dwell in his son, Jesus. When you read this verse you must read it in correlation to John 3:34-35 and Matthew 28:18:

“For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand.” – [John 3:34-35 ESV]

“And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” – [Matthew 28:18 ESV]

The father has given all things, including the church, into Christ’s hand and he has all power and all authority.

Verse 20 is the culmination of all this, “..that he might reconcile all things …by making peace through his blood.” Everything that Christ does through the church it is so that all things might be reconciled unto Himself through the shedding of His blood. I found the Apologetics Study Bible enlightening on this verse.

“This passage does not teach universalism (all will be saved) but instead points forward to Messiah’s quelling all rebellion, bringing lasting peace to the universe. The “reconciliation” here entails a pacification of evil powers (as 2:15 makes clear).” – The Apologetics Study Bible

In the commentary for Colossians 2:15 the Apologetics Study Bible says:

No contradiction exists here between Paul’s statement that the principalities and powers have been defeated and his assumption elsewhere that the powers are still virulently active and that believers need to fight against them (e.g., Eph 6:12). The cross of Christ is the point of decisive victory over the powers of evil; believers can now be victorious over them through their union with Christ. They will be vanquished once and for all at the end of the age. – The Apologetics Study Bible

There are two realms in which this reconciliation operates: the present and in the future. The present blessing of reconciliation is that you’ve been adopted into the family of God and you are made a co-heir with Christ according to Romans 8:17. The future blessing of reconciliation is that evil work and every power and principality will be obliterated and we (the Church) will enjoy the presence of Christ and be eternally consummated to Him. If you’re wondering about the past blessing of reconciliation it’s this: there is none because the blood of Jesus Christ has washed away your sinful past. The only thing that matters is your present and your future.

Deep Refreshing

Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me? Hope in God; for I shall again praise him, my salvation and my God. My soul is cast down within me; therefore I remember you from the land of Jordan and of Hermon, from Mount Mizar. Deep calls to deep at the roar of your waterfalls; all your breakers and your waves have gone over me. – [Psalms 42:5-7 ESV]

Just these verses, to me, reveal so much about God. David was discouraged. He was in exile longing to be in Jerusalem. He was in a place where, a lot of times, we find ourselves: in captivity. Maybe not in a physical captivity but we are, at times, caught in a binding stronghold feeling like we can’t get out. I don’t know, I might be the only one who’s ever felt this way. I’ve felt like I was in the same cycle over and over again. I’ve felt like I was slipping up over the same sins over and over again. I’ve felt trapped wondering, ‘When will all of this end?’

But out of all those times, God was still calling out to me. He was still reaching for depth inside me not because I’m anything special because I’m not. I’m a totally depraved human being, but when God saved me He put in me something that could that bring life to dead situations and that something is the Holy Spirit, the third person of the Godhead. No matter what you’re going through you can always depend on the comforting and strengthening power of the Holy Spirit to lead, guide, and direct into all truth and all righteousness.

The reason God calls out for that depth is because when He looks at you, as a believer, He sees that same Holy Spirit and knows the potential that He placed inside you to overcome.

I love what David said in the second part of verse 7: “…all your breakers and your waves have gone over me.” For those you who don’t know: water is usually represented in the Bible as the Holy Spirit because John 7:38 says:

Have faith in me, and you will have life-giving water flowing from deep inside you, just as the Scriptures say. – [John 7:38 CEV]

So, when I read Psalm 42:7 I imagined being so hot and thirsty, and this huge wave of cool refreshing pouring down over me and I realized that that’s how the Holy Spirit brings refreshing to us when we need it the most.

I hope this has blessed and encouraged you in some way, shape, or form.

“The LORD bless thee, and keep thee: The LORD make his face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee: The LORD lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.”
– [Numbers 6:24-26 RV]